Ryder Cup heading to New York in 2024

Bethpage Black in New York will host the 2024 Ryder Cup at Bethpage Black as well as the 101st US PGA Championship in 2019, it has been confirmed.

The Bethpage Black course is one of the most popular venues across the pond and is one of five within the state park on Long Island. It is famed for hosting the US Open five years ago where Lucas Glover won his maiden major title.

This is also good news for Rory McIlroy. The Northern Irishman won at the Bethpage Black course two years ago at the Barclays during the season-ending FedEx Cup playoffs and will be hoping for more success when he returns.

At just over 7,400 yards long, both the American and European team will need their longest hitters to have any success at a course notoriously unforgiving for the shorter player. The public course - the first of its kind to host the US Open - originally opened in 1936, designed by Albert Warren Tillingharst.

President of the PGA of America, Ted Bishop, spoke of his delight with the decision, telling reporters: "How fitting it is that we will be taking two of golf's premier events to a state that was the site of our first PGA Championship and to a spectacular course whose design was influenced by one of golf's most accomplished architects and a friend of The PGA of America.

"It is exciting that both the PGA Championship and the Ryder Cup will come to New York, which is home to some of the most passionate and knowledgeable sports fans in the world."

When the 2019 US PGA Championship rolls into town, it will be the 13th time New York has hosted the last major of the year; including the inaugural competition of 1916 at Siwanoy Country Club in Bronxville.

And then five years later in 2024, it will become only the second golf course in the state to have hosted the Ryder Cup since Oak Hill East Course was picked in 1995.

Before all this, however, the Ryder Cup heads to Scotland for this year’s 40th anniversary in Gleneagles with Europe looking to make it three wins in a row against their American counterparts.